Check Your Child's MAP Score



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NWEA MAP Scoring

The MAP Growth Test has, over the years, become increasingly popular among schools in the United States. MAP’s unique quality lies in its measuring of students' personal academic progress. MAP testing scores chart a student’s academic growth in a manner that is easy for both parents and teachers to understand. Preparing for the test can give your child the opportunity to not only reach his or her potential, but to maximize it.

How Are NWEA RIT Scores Calculated?

To calculate MAP assessment scores, NWEA uses the RIT, or Rasch unIT scale. This scale measures the value of a student’s score in relation to his or her scores on previous tests. Each RIT score indicates a point on a continuous scale of learning. These NWEA scores are not to be interpreted as target scores, but rather as benchmarks of a student’s academic skill level over a given period of time. Questions on the MAP receive their RIT values after being tested on thousands of students across the United States. Responses to items throughout a student’s test are used to produce the final RIT score for that student.

The numerical (RIT) value given to a student predicts that at that specific difficulty level, a student is likely to answer about 50% of the questions correctly. Results are scored across an even interval scale, meaning that the difference between scores remains consistent regardless of whether a student scores high or low. It also means that grade level is not a factor. Since the MAP test is taken on a computer, once the child finishes the test, scores are immediately available.

 

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MAP Testing Score RIT Charts for Math, Language Usage & Reading

NWEA MAP RIT Percentiles (Fall 2020 Norms)

Kindergarten
  Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
160 --- 157 95
152 --- 149 84
146 --- 143 69
Median and
Mean
140 --- 137 50
 Lower
Achievement
133 --- 131 31
127 --- 124 16
119 --- 117  5
1st Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
181 --- 177 95
172 --- 169 84
166 --- 162 69
Median and
Mean
160 --- 156 50
Lower
Achievement
154 --- 150 31
148 --- 143 16
140 --- 135 5
2nd Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
196 200 197 95
188 190 187 84
181 182 180 69
Median and
Mean
175 174 172 50
Lower
Achievement
169 166 165 31
162 158 157 16
154 148 147 5
3rd Grade
  Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
211 213 214 95
202 203 203 84
195 195 195 69
Median and
Mean
188 188 187 50
Lower
Achievement
182 180 178 31
175 172 170 16
166 163 159  5
4th Grade
  Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
223 222 224 95
214 212 213 84
207 205 205 69
Median and
Mean
200 197 197 50
Lower
Achievement
192 190 188 31
185 182 180 16
176 172 169  5
5th Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
234 228 231 95
224 219 221 84
217 211 213 69
Median and
Mean
209 204 204 50
Lower
Achievement
202 197 196 31
194 190 188 16
184 180 178  5
6th Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
241 233 237 95
231 224 227 84
223 217 218 69
Median and
Mean
215 209 210 50
Lower
Achievement
207 202 202 31
199 195 194 16
188 186 183  5
7th Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
249 237 241 95
238 227 231 84
229 220 222 69
Median and
Mean
220 213 214 50
Lower
Achievement
212 205 206 31
203 198 198 16
192 188 187  5
8th Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
256 240 246 95
244 230 235 84
234 223 226 69
Median and
Mean
225 216 218 50
Lower
Achievement
216 208 210 31
206 201 201 16
194 191 190  5
9th Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
259 242 250 95
246 232 238 84
236 224 228 69
Median and
Mean
226 217 219 50
Lower
Achievement
217 209 209 31
207 201 200 16
194 191 188  5
10th Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
262 244 251 95
249 234 239 84
239 226 230 69
Median and
Mean
229 219 221 50
Lower
Achievement
219 211 213 31
209 204 204 16
196 194 192  5
11th Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
266 245 253 95
252 236 241 84
242 228 232 69
Median and
Mean
232 221 224 50
Lower
Achievement
222 213 215 31
211 206 206 16
198 196 194  5
12th Grade
    Mathematics Language Usage Reading Percentile
Higher
Achievement
269 --- 256 95
254 --- 243 84
244 --- 233 69
Median and
Mean
233 --- 224 50
Lower
Achievement
222 --- 214 31
212 --- 205 16
197 --- 191  5
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Use the following coupon code to get a 10% discount: TPO10
This coupon is valid until October 31, 2021

These NWEA reports show the MAP scores percentiles distribution in fall 2020 based on grade level. In order to understand how well a student performed on the test, his or her RIT score is compared to all of the other results from students in the same age group (the same grade). This measurement is called a percentile, and it tells you what percentage of your child’s peers he or she outperformed on the test.

For example, according to the first row of the chart for 5th grade (you can change the grade with the arrows on the left), in order to score better than 95% of your peers, you would need to receive a 234 in mathematics, a 228 in language usage, and a 231 in reading. An alternative example can be a 5th-grade student who scored 233 in mathematics – a little bit below the 95th percentile, 212 in language usage – a little bit above the 69th percentile, and 190 in reading – a bit above the 16th percentile.

Use the NWEA percentile benchmarks below to better understand your child’s latest test score, compared with others.

Note:
There are no NWEA MAP Language Usage tests in kindergarten and 1st grade. In addition, there are no available norms for the Language Usage section for 12th grade because an insufficient number of students in this grade took this section. 
All MAP test percentiles are from the NWEA website.

Need to prepare your child for the next test date? On the following links you will find everything you need for a proper preparation. Not sure which level you should choose? Email Ariav, TestPrep-Online's expert for MAP tests, at ask_ariav@testprep-online.com. Please mention your child's recent RIT scores and we will tailor the most suitable preparation for you.
Free MAP Practice Resources Full MAP PrepPacks
2nd Grade MAP Free Practice 2nd Grade MAP Full Pack
3rd Grade MAP Free Practice 3rd Grade MAP Full Pack
4th Grade MAP Free Practice 4th Grade MAP Full Pack
5th Grade MAP Free Practice 5th Grade MAP Full Pack
6th Grade MAP Free Practice 6th Grade MAP Full Pack
7th Grade MAP Free Practice 7th Grade MAP Full Pack
8th Grade MAP Free Practice 8th Grade MAP Full Pack
We also recommend watching this short video which shortly explains the basics of the NWEA MAP Growth Test:
 

 

Tips: How to Improve MAP Reading & Language Usage RIT Scores

  • Read a variety of texts. Boosting your vocabulary and getting used to reading challenging texts can both be done through making sure to read texts you are unaccustomed to.
  • Become an active reader. Actively reading means keeping yourself focused on the main goals of the text, searching for the main purpose of each paragraph and how it contributes to the overall role of the text. This skill is absolutely vital for reading comprehension questions.
  • Carry a vocabulary notebook. Came across a new word? Jot it down! Writing it makes it easier to remember. You will be surprised how many useful words you’ll come across, especially if you follow our first tip.
  • Practice speed reading techniques. Linked to active reading, speed reading can be an excellent way of zeroing in on the main purpose of passages and thus saving valuable time during the test. Remember: while the MAP is not a timed exam, the mind itself has a limit to how long it can remain focused, so that, no matter what, your time is limited.
  • Practice with MAP reading comprehension questions. Using actual map reading comprehension questions during your revision process can help you get used to the format of the exam and thus keep you from getting get taken aback come test day.

Tips: How to Improve NWEA MAP Math RIT Scores

  • Solve one math problem a day. Math becomes far less threatening when you make the goal to practice it a little smaller. Thus, we recommend starting with one math problem a day and working your way from there.
  • Practice using specific math techniques. Sometimes getting to the right answer with a math problem is all about nailing down the right technique to use. Therefore, take the time to learn and revise various methods of solving mathematical problems.
  • Know the why, not just the how. Especially with math questions, It can be very easy to fall into the trap of answering the question simply through using the standard given formula and nothing more. However, it is important to make sure you understand the formula as well. If not it can be extra tricky when you reach questions that are a little more abstract and a little less straightforward.
  • Go back to the basics. Having trouble with the complicated stuff? No problem! We recommend revising the simpler stuff once more. Very often a simple gap in past learned material is the only thing standing between you and the right answer.
  • Practice with MAP math questions. MAP math questions can be an excellent way to get used to both the format and the phrasing of the questions as well as give you hints on some of the classic “tricks” you may find on the actual exam.

How to Read & Interpret Reports of MAP Test Scores

A typical NWEA MAP Growth Scores Report, in a nutshell, is designed to show you how your student has progressed academically both overall and from semester to semester. Find out how to read and interpret the different components of an NWEA MAP Test Scores Report, including the graph, table, and descriptors.

Map progress report

*Report taken from the official NWEA Site*

Inside the Graph

The graph in the student progress report provides insight to academic ability and advancement in a four-part fashion:

Individual Student Progress: The blue line in the graph represents only the student's progress and allows parents and educators to analyze the student's academic development in terms of his or her own personal achievement. 

District Grade Level Mean: The orange line provides insight into the average student’s progress within the district. This allows you to view your student's score in a local context.

Norm Grade Level Mean RIT Score: The yellow line provides insight into the average student progress on a national scale. While this information is useful for parents, it is exceptionally beneficial for educators, as they can gain insight into district performance in comparison to the rest of the country.

Future Progress Prediction: The dotted line in the graph provides a prediction for your student's future progress, on the basis of how they have performed in the past.

Map student progress graph

*Graph taken from the official NWEA Site*

 

Inside the Table

In the table next to the graph you will find insight into your student's progress from year to year in terms of RIT scores.

RIT (+/- Std Err)- shows the student's RIT scores, with the middle number being the actual RIT score achieved, and the other two numbers providing a range indicating that if the student were to take the test again they would likely score within these values.

RIT Growth- shows student's RIT growth from one semester to another. More often than not, the column shows the growth from one fall semester to the next.

Growth Projection- shows the prediction of a student's growth. 

Map RIT percentile range

*Table taken from the official NWEA Site*

 

Inside the Descriptors

The role of the descriptors below the graph is to provide more details into the student's abilities within specific components of a given subject area. These descriptors are exceptionally useful in helping you map out where to start in your preparation process for the next test. In the examples below, skill level is represented by RIT scores. In addition, a lexile range is included, which helps parents and educators determine a student’s reading level and match him or her with appropriate texts. 

Map reading goals performanceMap mathematics goals performance

*Descriptors taken from the official NWEA Site*

Note that some reports may present levels through ratings other than RIT scores:


Low- <21st percentile
LoAvg- 21st-40th percentile
Avg- 41st-60th percentile
HiAvg- 61st-80th percentile
High- >81st percentile

 

How RIT Scores are Used: Academic Measurement & Gifted Identification

RIT scores are used to track your child’s progress over a period of time. The scores are not meant to be used as a tool of comparison between students, nor are the scores used as an indication of course achievement. MAP scoring is a means of representing your child’s academic skill set. Proper preparation can provide a more accurate report of these academic abilities.

Because of MAP's unique RIT scoring system, it is often used as a means to spot gifted students. Check out our MAP Test Scores Gifted Charts below to get an idea of what a gifted score may look like:

**Please note that our charts are only an estimation of gifted measurement and reflects solely upon the top percentile norms of 2020 (the 95th and 84th percentiles).

 

NWEA MAP RIT Scores for Gifted Programs

Grade Mathematics Language Reading
K 160 152 -- -- 157 149
1 181 172 -- -- 177 169
2 196 188 200 190 197 187
3 211 202 213 203 214 203
4 223 214 222 212 224 213
5 234 224 228 219 231 221
6 241 231 233 224 237 227
7 249 238 237 227 241 231
8 256 244 240 230 246 235
9 259 246 242 232 250 238
10 262 249 244 234 251 239
11 266 252 245 236 253 241

*Please note that there are no NWEA MAP Language Usage tests in kindergarten and 1st grade.

How Should My Child Progress Over Time?

RIT scores are expected to increase over time. Scores of students in lower grades tend to increase more quickly than those of students in higher grades due to the increased level of difficulty of the higher grade-level tests. RIT scores generally range between 140 and 300. In third grade, students usually score anywhere between 140 and 190, and in higher grade levels they may progress to a score between 240 and 300.

Improve Your Child's NWEA MAP Scores with TestPrep-Online!

Though the NWEA reports may help you understand your child’s score better, they are not enough to ensure a better one in the future. To receive a better MAP test percentile ranking, your child needs to practice using the correct study tools.

Our MAP practice packs can gauge your child's abilities, whether your child is at the top of the class or needs some extra guidance. Our practice tests with varying levels of difficulty in every test subject will help your child improve, no matter what his or her level is.

With over 800 questions to work with, your child is guaranteed to feel challenged. Access our MAP practice material today so your child can feel confident and prepared on test day.

 

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The OLSAT, NNAT, CogAT, New York City Gifted and Talented Test, MAP, and other trademarks are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of the trademark holders are affiliated with TestPrep-Online or this website.

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